Prize Winners

A proud tradition of prize giving since 1862

The Society is always looking for ways to help further the work of today’s scientists and it awards a number of prizes for new publications, inventions, investigations or discoveries in the fields of mathematics, physics and the natural sciences. Awards given are the Sir Isaac Newton Bursary, the William Bate Hardy Prize and the William Hopkins Prize.
 

The William Hopkins Prize - founded in 1862 in memory of William Hopkins (1793-1866)

The following are the regulations for the William Hopkins Prize

1. That the Prize be called ‘The William Hopkins Prize’.

2. That the Prize be adjudged once in three years.

3. (a) That the Prize be awarded in connection with work in Mathematico-Physical or Mathematico-Experimental science  or Mathematics alone or Experimental Physics alone by a member of the University of Cambridge, either

  • for the best publication, invention, investigation or discovery that has been published during the three years immediately preceding (but that the adjudicators may, if it seem to them advisable in any particular case, award the prize for a publication, invention, investigation or discovery which has not been published within the aforementioned period) or
  • to an individual for an especially distinguished contribution in early career, or
  • in recognition of a lifetime contribution.

    (b)  Each Prize for the best publication, invention, investigation or discovery may be awarded to the laboratory or group responsible for it (or to an individual in the case of individual work).  It may be restricted to a laboratory or group in or closely associated with, the University of Cambridge.

4.  That the fund be vested in the Cambridge Philosophical Society, and the Prize be adjudged by three Fellows of the Society, nominated by the Council of the Society for each occasion.

5.  That, in the event of any difficulty arising in carrying out the above provisions in any particular instance, either from lack of a prize-subject of sufficient merit, or from any other cause, the Council of the Cambridge Philosophical Society be at liberty to carry over the amount of the Prize for that term towards augmenting the fund for future prizes, or to award it to someone not a member of the University.

6.   That the value of the Prize be £1000, or such sum as shall from time to time be determined by the Council.

 

The William Bate Hardy Prize - founded in 1964 in memory of Sir William Bate Hardy (1864-1934)

The following are the regulations for the William Bate Hardy Prize

1.  That the Prize be called the 'William Bate Hardy Prize'.

2.   That this Prize be adjudged once in three years.

3.  (a)  That the Prize be awarded in connection with work in Biological Science by a member of the University of Cambridge, either

     (i)         for the best publication, invention, investigation or discovery that has been published during the three years immediately preceding (but that the adjudicators may, if it seem to them advisable in any particular case, award the prize for a publication, invention, investigation or discovery which has not been published within the aforementioned period) or

     (ii)      to an individual for an especially distinguished contribution in early career, or

     (iii)     in recognition of a lifetime contribution.

   (b)  Each Prize for the best publication, invention, investigation or discovery may be awarded to the laboratory or group responsible for it (or to an individual in the case of individual work). It may be restricted to a laboratory or group in or closely associated with, the University of Cambridge.

4.  That the Prize be adjudged by three Fellows of the Society, nominated by the Council of the Society for each occasion.

5.  That, in the event of any difficulty arising in carrying out the above provisions in any particular instance, either from lack of a prize-subject of sufficient merit, or from any other cause, the Council of the Cambridge Philosophical Society be at liberty not to award the Prize or to award it to someone not a member of the University.

6.  That the value of the Prize be £1000, or such sum as shall from time to time be determined by the Council.

 

Isaac Newton Bursaries – instigated by the Society in 1991 with the aim of contributing to the scientific targets of the Isaac Newton Institute

The Society offers bursaries for nominated participants to programmes at the Isaac Newton Institute.  These bursaries are intended to enable the participation for a limited period of time of meritorious younger individuals for whom financial backing may not otherwise be available (perhaps for reasons of age, background, or scientific development). 

In awarding these bursaries, the Society hopes to aid the professional development of the recipients, while at the same time contributing to the scientific targets of the Isaac Newton Institute.

Eight bursaries of £250.00 each are awarded annually by the Council of the Society, following recommendations from the Institute.